Florida, May 2008
Part II

After Part I

May 10-17, 2008

Saturday, May 10, 2008

What's happening here?


PS: We moved the suitcases from one house to the other. Now that Watcharee's dental work is complete we can plan our return to Bangkok.


Sunday, May 11, 2008 (Mothers Day)

Stephani gets a Moms Day gift.

Alf,

My friend from the Humane Society called to let me know that they had the sweetest little puppy come in. Robin and I went to take a look and..I think you can guess the end result. Photos of Maxwell are enclosed.

He is so sweet and Eli is being very tolerant.

Love,
Stephani


Monday, May 12, 2008

I have been in Florida way too long!


PS:

President Apostate?

By Op-Ed Contributor EDWARD N. LUTTWAK, Chevy Chase, Md.

BARACK OBAMA has emerged as a classic example of charismatic leadership – a figure upon whom others project their own hopes and desires. The resulting emotional intensity adds greatly to the more conventional strengths of the well-organized Obama campaign, and it has certainly sufficed to overcome the formidable initial advantages of Senator Hillary Clinton.

One danger of such charisma, however, is that it can evoke unrealistic hopes of what a candidate could actually accomplish in office regardless of his own personal abilities. Case in point is the oft-made claim that an Obama presidency would be welcomed by the Muslim world.

This idea often goes hand in hand with the altogether more plausible argument that Mr. Obama's election would raise America's esteem in Africa – indeed, he already arouses much enthusiasm in his father's native Kenya and to a degree elsewhere on the continent.

But it is a mistake to conflate his African identity with his Muslim heritage. Senator Obama is half African by birth and Africans can understandably identify with him. In Islam, however, there is no such thing as a half-Muslim. Like all monotheistic religions, Islam is an exclusive faith.

As the son of the Muslim father, Senator Obama was born a Muslim under Muslim law as it is universally understood. It makes no difference that, as Senator Obama has written, his father said he renounced his religion. Likewise, under Muslim law based on the Koran his mother's Christian background is irrelevant.

Of course, as most Americans understand it, Senator Obama is not a Muslim. He chose to become a Christian, and indeed has written convincingly to explain how he arrived at his choice and how important his Christian faith is to him.

His conversion, however, was a crime in Muslim eyes; it is "irtidad" or "ridda," usually translated from the Arabic as "apostasy," but with connotations of rebellion and treason. Indeed, it is the worst of all crimes that a Muslim can commit, worse than murder (which the victim's family may choose to forgive).

With few exceptions, the jurists of all Sunni and Shiite schools prescribe execution for all adults who leave the faith not under duress; the recommended punishment is beheading at the hands of a cleric, although in recent years there have been both stonings and hangings. (Some may point to cases in which lesser punishments were ordered – as with some Egyptian intellectuals who have been punished for writings that were construed as apostasy – but those were really instances of supposed heresy, not explicitly declared apostasy as in Senator Obama's case.)

It is true that the criminal codes in most Muslim countries do not mandate execution for apostasy (although a law doing exactly that is pending before Iran's Parliament and in two Malaysian states). But as a practical matter, in very few Islamic countries do the governments have sufficient authority to resist demands for the punishment of apostates at the hands of religious authorities.

For example, in Iran in 1994 the intervention of Pope John Paul II and others won a Christian convert a last-minute reprieve, but the man was abducted and killed shortly after his release. Likewise, in 2006 in Afghanistan, a Christian convert had to be declared insane to prevent his execution, and he was still forced to flee to Italy.

Because no government is likely to allow the prosecution of a President Obama – not even those of Iran and Saudi Arabia, the only two countries where Islamic religious courts dominate over secular law – another provision of Muslim law is perhaps more relevant: it prohibits punishment for any Muslim who kills any apostate, and effectively prohibits interference with such a killing.

At the very least, that would complicate the security planning of state visits by President Obama to Muslim countries, because the very act of protecting him would be sinful for Islamic security guards. More broadly, most citizens of the Islamic world would be horrified by the fact of Senator Obama's conversion to Christianity once it became widely known – as it would, no doubt, should he win the White House. This would compromise the ability of governments in Muslim nations to cooperate with the United States in the fight against terrorism, as well as American efforts to export democracy and human rights abroad.

That an Obama presidency would cause such complications in our dealings with the Islamic world is not likely to be a major factor with American voters, and the implication is not that it should be. But of all the well-meaning desires projected on Senator Obama, the hope that he would decisively improve relations with the world's Muslims is the least realistic.

Edward N. Luttwak, a fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, is the author of "Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace."


Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Old brochures surface!

When cleaning out a drawer I found these two Soviet era brochures. Both date from my first trip to the USSR almost 30 years ago.

The first one touts the virtues of flying Aeroflot, the Soviet monopoly airline. Since few Soviet citizens had a chance to travel abroad, they had nothing to compare it with. Suffice, it was awful. The seats were small and cramped and the meals largely consisted of "Chicken Aeroflot". No alcohol was served on board as the Soviet minders did not trust their citizens with a mix of flying and vodka. However, on international routes where it competed with foreign carries, it was not awful.

The second brochure describes the Astoria Hotel in Leningrad (now Saint Petersburg). That Intourist hotel was as good as the Soviet airline was bad. Built before World War I, it was the hotel that Hitler was going to use for his victory speech. Over the years I stayed there a number of times. However, on our last balloon trip in Saint Petersburg we stayed at the Europa Hotel, though we visited the Astoria.


Wednesday, May 14, 2008

Our Bangkok interior designer has submitted some sketches for the design and decoration of our condo at the Athenee Residence. Here are the sketches for the living room, master bedroom and the entertainment room. Also, here are three photographs ... from roughly the same angle ... that I took of those rooms in March.




Thursday, May 15, 2008

My 4th 'find'.

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=f91150ee-bd6a-413a-9a92-4b576ba1a2cc


PS: My two monthly law rags suggest that practicing law is not as much fun as it once was.


Friday, May 16, 2008

Our Bangkok interior design firm send these sketches of my office/closet. Also, I am showing two photographs that I took of this office/closet area a couple of months ago.

The design sketch shows in one picture the built-in cabinets and desk that will be on the south wall of the room. {Nope, that guy does not look like me.} My photo shows the east window and this south wall ... to the right in the picture.


The three design sketches of the closet show the two side walls of the closet and the back of the closet. My photo looks into the closet on an angle and it also show the south wall of the office which will support the built-ins.


I am sure that this is of no interest to my readers; but, it is good for me.

Wait! I have a cute photo of Stephani's new dog getting lost in the grass.


Saturday May 17, 2008 (Syttende Mai)

Dislike telemarketers? Watch this:

Next: Part III

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